Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer Part 8: More Software

In my last post I talked about how to get the Arduino to output bursts of 40kHz pulses. Today I’ll go through the rest of the software so by the end of this post we’ll have a very rudimentary but working sketch for our ultrasonic wind meter.

Click here for an overview over this series of posts on the Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer: http://soldernerd.com/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer/

overview2_1ms
Overview over one round of measurements, i.e. each direction is measured once in turn.

If you’ve read part 7 of this series you will have noticed that all the key tasks are handled not in the main code but in interrupt service routines (ISRs). That’s fairly typical for an application like this one.

In this project, there are 2 ISRs:

  • TIMER1_COMPB Interrupt: It is triggered by Timer/Counter1. It sends 15 PWM pulses every 2ms and takes care of the Axis, Direction and Mute signals. Named TMR_INT on the screen shots in this post. This is what I’ve covered last time.
  • TIMER1_CAPT Interrupt: This is where all the measurement takes place. It is triggered by the envelope detector and zero-crossing detectcor. It reads the current value of Timer/Counter1. Named CAPT_INT on the screen shots in this post. This is what I’ve covered last time. This is mainly what I’ll be covering today.

The basic Idea of the software is as follows:

  1. Every measurement takes 2ms. It takes 375us (15 times 25us) to send the pulses plus 500us – 1500us for the pulses to arrive (assuming very extreme wind situations). So 2ms gives us plenty of time to finish our measurement.
  2. Shortly after sending the pulses we start listening and wait for the envelope detector to trigger TIMER1_CAPT interrupt. We save the current value of timer1, this is our coarse measurement of time-of-flight. We then set up interrupts to capture a rising edge of our zero-crossing detector (ZCD).
  3. A rising edge of our ZCD triggers TIMER_CAPT interrupt. We save the current value of timer1 and set up interrupts to capture a falling edge of the ZCD.
  4. A falling edge of our ZCD triggers TIMER_CAPT interrupt. We save the current value of timer1 and set up interrupts to capture a rising edge of the ZCD.
  5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until we’ve captured 8 rising and 8 falling edges. Averaging these will give us a very precise measurement of the phase shift.
  6. After every measurement we change the direction we measure:  N->S, E->W, S->N, W->E, …
  7. We measure each direction 32 times until we calculate the actual wind speed. So one full measurement will take 4 x 32 x 2ms = 256ms. So we take about 4 measurements per second.
overview2_172us
Overview over a single measuement

The screen shot above shows how a measuement proceeds: AXIS and DIRECTION are set depending on the direction to be measured. MUTE is driven high and 15 PWM pulses are sent. TMR_INT  triggers after every pulse in order to count them. After a short break, TMR_INT triggers again and turns MUTE off again. Eventually, the envelope detector (ENV_DETCT) triggers CAPT_INT. Shortly afterwards, CAPT_INT is triggered 16 more times by the zero-crossing detector (ZCD).

overview2_35us
Close-up of the actual measurement.

There are 2 sets of variables to save all the measurements from the envelope and zero-crossing detector: At any point in time, one is in use by the ongoing measurements, i.e. they’re being updated. The other set represents the last set of measurements and is static. This second set can be used by software in our main loop to calculate the wind speed and direction. As I’ve said, capturing one set of measurements takes 256ms. So we also have 256ms to do all the calculations, send data (via USB or whatever), write the new measurement to the display, do some data logging or whatever else we have in mind. There is likely to be some floating-point math, square roots and tigonometric functions going to be needed to arrive at the wind speed and direction but 256ms should be pretty comfortable even for that.

overview2_8ms
A long series of measuements. Look at the cursors: It takes about 25ms to do our calculations.

This is what I’ve tried to show in the screenshot above: There is a signal named CALC which is driven high when a new set of measuements becomes available and driven low when the calculations are finished. So this signal shows you how much time the Arduino’s Atmega328 spends processing the data and writing to the display. As you can see, it’s less than 25ms so there is ample of room for more complex calculations or other tasks. We’ll definitely need some of that head room since the calculations performed so far are really just the bare minimum.

There definitely is still a lot to be improved, mainly how the raw measurements are evaluated to get the actual wind speed. But what’s more important to me at this time is that the basic idea/setup works. With no wind, my measuements fluctuate somewhere between plus/minus 0.3 meters per second without having done any calibration. It also reacts nicely when I blow a bit of air towards it.

I’ve changed the pinout many times while developing this software but I’m confident that I won’t have to change the pinout any more. So my plan is to now build version 2 of the hardware first. The entire setup will be much less complex (and prone to errors) without all the lose wires going back and forth between the different boards. Then, with the updated and hopefully final (or nearly final) hardware I’ll go ahead and finish the software.

Speaking of software: You can download the Arduino sketch from the overview page where you also find the Eagle files for both boards: http://soldernerd.com/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer/. I’ll make it a habit to post all the download material for this project on the overview page so people don’t need to go through all the posts trying to find a certain file.

That’s it for today, continue here to my next post of this series: http://soldernerd.com/2014/11/25/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer-part-9-a-new-hardware/

2 thoughts on “Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer Part 8: More Software”

  1. Hello, well i will do a sonic anemometer with arduino one and i think use a HC-SR04 ultrasonic sensor for arduino, can i use this sensor for this proyect?

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s