USB Boost Converter

_MG_1042
Finished 5V to 12V USB boost converter

I frequently need a low-power supply to run a microcontroller system. Typically, one uses a lab power for such purposes. But at least on the desk where I do the programming I don’t have one. Since these systems typically consume little current it would be handy to be able to power them from USB. Most of my devices have on-board regulators so the voltage is rather uncritical. For 3.3 volt devices, the 5V from USB is just right. But others have a 5V regulator so they need a higher supply voltage. And even others might even need 12 volts.

_MG_1035
Fully assembled PCB

So I decided to build a small low-power boost converter with a USB plug on its input. The output voltage is set by a pair of resistors. So once built the output voltage is fix but my idea is to build several of them anyway. So some will produce 12V while others will produce 7.5V. The latter is intended to power all those systems with on-board 5V regulators. Of course, you could use a trimmer or pot if you wanted a variable voltage version. However, the feedback loop requires a capacitor for stability and its value also depends on output voltage. You might well find a value that results in stable operation over a say 6 – 12V range, but I haven’t tried that.

_MG_1015
Bottom side

I had a look for a suitable integrated switcher IC and found the Texas Instruments LMR62014. It comes in a small SOT23-5 package. It switches at a high frequency of 1.6MHz which will keep the other components small, too. It switches up to 1.4 amps. It’s easy to use. And even afordable, around 1.50 a piece. The datasheet is very helpful when it comes to PCB layout. It includes a two-layer sample layout that works even with hobbyist-sized components (0805, 1206 for the input and output capacitors).

20141115_173315
Not a bad heat sink

Generally, layout is important with switch-mode DC-DC converters. Their operation requires switching square-wave power signals (as opposed to just logical-level signals where little current flows). And that requires careful layout in order to minimize stray inductance, mainly. Things are more forgiving when you work with relatively slow (say 100kHz) switchers but get much more demanding when switching at higher frequencies. There has been a steady trend to ever-higher frequencies and 1.6MHz is fairly high even by 2015 standards. So I was very happy to have a nice layout example to start with.

_MG_1014
Top side

As you can see from the photo above, the thing is small, only 26 x 14mm. Also note how the layout makes the components magically fit together without any long traces and few vias.

20141115_173232
Home brew constant current dummy load in action

So far, I’ve built two units, one running at 12V, the other at 7.5V. Theoretically, one should be able to pull 580mA and 930mA from them, respectively. Of course, these are theoretical figures assuming no losses. Also, the 1.4A rating on the IC is likely the current limit at the top of the switching cycle (the datasheet will tell you or course but I don’t have the PDF open right now), not an average. And thermal considerations might also put limits on continuous currents. More on that later. And don’t expect to be able to pull 1.4A from a random USB port (which would violate the USB specifications anyway). But given my use-case for these things I’m entirely happy if I can pull a 100mA or so. And that should work comfortably.

20141116_144615
Switcher IC: 70 degrees @ 200mA
20141116_144627
Diode: 58 degrees @ 200mA
20141116_144553
Coil: 50 degrees @ 200mA

I’ve pushed both versions to their respective limits on the bench, using a stiff 5V supply and my home-brew constant current dummy load (link). With case temperatures approaching 100 degrees centigrade I was able to pull around 250mA of continuous current from the 12V version. The ICs include thermal limiting so you don’t need to worry too much about damaging them when performing this kind of tests. As you can see on the photos, I did these tests with the naked PCBs sitting in a vise which probabely made a not-so-bad heatsink for the board as a whole.

20141116_144738
Output voltage folds back when the switcher gets too hot

I’ve encountered slight stability problems with the 12V version (but not with the 7.5V one). There is some oscillation at currents above 200mA or so. Changing the value of the compensation capacitor changed the frequency and amplitude but I haven’t managed to get rid of it entirely. But anyway, I won’t run them at 200mA so I haven’t put much more effort into this.

_MG_1045
Close up of the final product

The finished units have a USB wire on the input and a arduino-compatible plug on the output. To protect against short-circuits I’ve put them in a piece of shrinking hose which is a bit of a themal nightmare of course. There is also a voltage drop over the USB cable which means the input voltage seen by the converter is below 5V even with a perfectly stiff USB port. Which in turn means more work for our converter, making things worse.

_MG_1040
Shrinking hose doesn’t help in keeping it cool

I have frequently used the 7.5V version to power my Ultrasonic Anemometer which pulls around 60mA. That’s the kind of application that I had in mind for this little device and it works well for that. It hardly gets warm at all and provides reliable power on my desk without the need for a lab power supply.

Attached the Eagle files as well as a PDF of the schematic and layout: USB_BoostConverter

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s