Tag Archives: arduino uno

Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer Part 10: Arduino Shield Ready

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A world’s first: Ultrasonic Anemometer Shield for Arduino Uno

I’m happy to announce that my new Arduino wind meter shield is ready. I had posted the design as well as a photo or two of the naked board in my last post but now I’ve placed and soldered all the numerous components and it’s ready to go.

Click here for an overview over this series of posts on the Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer: http://soldernerd.com/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer/

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Looking pretty. Any good? Don’t know yet.

So now all my custom hardware boils down to this easy-to-use Arduino UNO shield. Just stack it on top of your Arduino,  attach four ultrasonic transducers and you’re ready to go.

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Bottom side

I have high expectations for this shield and hope I won’t be disappointed. I’ll check on the weekend when I’ll first power it up and see if it’s any good. I’ll let you know.

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Straight from above

Click here to see how the new shield perfoms: http://soldernerd.com/2014/11/30/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer-part-11-testing-the-new-hardware/

Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer Part 9: A new hardware

My first wind meter prototype is kind of working. The software will need improvement to make this wind meter into something really useful. But both hardware and software are basically functional and can be built up upon.

If you’re new here, you might want to check out the overview over this series of posts on the arduino-based ultrasonic anemometer: http://soldernerd.com/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer/.

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The new ultrasonic wind meter Arduino shield

The next thing I will do is re-design the entire hardware. Instead of two distinct boards with wires all over the place I will design a single, standard-sized Arduino Shield that can be stacked on an Arduino Uno. Just like any of those commercially available shields that add motor control, Ethernet or whatever. That will make the whole setup much smaller and simpler. And I hope this will also make it easier for others (like you?) who want to build their own.

This re-design is what I’m going to talk about today so I guess there won’t be much in the way of photos, just some schematics and board layouts. And I’ll put all the Eagle files on the overview page as a zip download. Here’s what I’ve changed and why:

Power supply

The first version used the (unregulated) Vin of the Arduino so it had a linear 5V regulator of its own. On top of that there was also a flying capacitor type inverter to generate a -5V rail for the analog multiplexer. Both of these chips have been eliminated. I’m now using the the 5V rail straight from the Arduino, there is just a 100uF tantal input cap. The -5V is no longer needed by the multiplexer. I’ll later explain why.

Signal routing / pulse generation / drive

The drivers are entirely new: I’ve replaced the two 74HC368 inverters with a single 74HC126 non-inverting line driver / buffer. It has four 3-state buffers, one for each transducer. The negative pin of each transducer is simply grounded in the new design. That costs us half the signal amplitude but simplifies things greatly. And our two-stage amplifier should have more than enough gain to make up for that.

As suggested earlier, there is only a single 74HC4052 left (instead of 3). We will get some crosstalk issues but we’re always transmitting or receiving, never both at the same time. Plus, the tuned amplifier filters out most of that high frequency stuff (such as square waves). And we have the option to mute the amplifier, this time both at the input as well as on the output. Not sure if we’ll need it, I’ll check once everything else is working.

Permanently grounding the negative pin of the transducers means we only have four signals to worry about. So I’m only using half of the 4052 to chose exactly one of the four signals. Y0, Y1, Y2, Y3 as inputs from the four transducers and Y as output that goes to the amplifier.

But why don’t I need the -5V anymore? Here is why. In my first design I routed the signal from the transducers straight through the 4052. Because this signal swings around ground, it will be negative half of the time and positive the other half. So I needed both a negative and a positive supply. Later, that signal was capacitively coupled into the amplifier where it was biased so somewhere around 2.3 volts. Now I already do the biasing before the 4052. So the signal will be positive at all times and hence there’s no longer a need for a negative voltage. I find this a really elegant solution, I just hope it will work 😉

There is still an Axis and Direction signal controlling a 74HC139 encoder generating the enable signals for the transducer drivers / output buffers. I had LEDs on these enable signals in the first version, these are no longer present. The software changes the axis/direction every 2ms so you won’t be able to see anything now.

The 74HC126 has active high enable signals (as opposed to the 125 which is otherwise identical). Since all but one enable signals are high, only one transducer can float freely. That’s our receiving transducer. That also means that the other 3 transducers are actively driven so only one of them must receive the PWM signal.

This is how I’ve solved this: As I said, I only used half of the 4052 for the tranducer signals. So the other half can be used to route the PWM signal from the Arduino to the correct output buffer. So the signal from the Arduino is connected to the input X and the outputs X0, X1, X2, X3 carry the signal to the different gates of the 74HC126. There is one potential problem: The outputs that are not selected are floating freely so there are 10k pull-down resistors on X0, X1, X2 and X3.

So from the 8 large ICs on the first version, only 3 are left. That saves plenty of board space so we can fit our circuit on a standard sized Arduino shield.

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Same board from the other side

Amplifier

The basic design with two stages of tuned common emitter amplifiers with NPN darlington pairs has worked well so I’ll stick to that.

The main shortcoming of my first version was the 47uH plus 330nF LC tank (see part 4) so I’m changing that to 1mH plus 15.82nF. Same resonant frequency but much higher impedance. The inductor I’ve chosen has a dc resistance of a bit more than 16 ohms which will give a Q-factor of around 15 – comfortable for our application.

The main change is the biasing. A wind meter will be deployed outside so it is likely to see great variation in temperature. So the biasing of our amplifier and thus the quiscent current need to be stable over a wide temperature range. Two things make this a difficult task here: First, we’re using darlington pairs which means twice the variation in base-emitter drop. Second, our rather low operating voltage of 5 volts.

A common solution for difficult biasing situations is the use of a matched transistor to generate the base biasing voltage. And that’s what I’ll do here. Each stage has an additional darlington pair with collector and base connected for this purpose. So the collector will always be 2 diode drops (around 1.3V at room temperature) above its emitter. I want the emitter to sit 1V above ground and 1mA of quiscent current. So I add a 1k emitter resistor and a 2.7k collector resistor and get just that.

Base emitter drop will change by about -2mV per degree per transistor. So for a 50 degree increase in change in temperature, the drop accross our darlington pair will change from 1.3V to 1.1V – quite substantial. But quiscent current will only increase to 1.054mA and the emitter will then sit 1.054V above ground. A 5.4% variation for a 50 degree change in temperature. Not bad at all I think.

The last change to the amplifier is that I’ve put the gain limitting resistors (R7 and R12) in series with only the bypass caps (C5 and C10).  This will let me change the gain without affecting biasing which is given by R8 and R13.

Zero Crossing Detector (ZCD)

Almost no change here. I’ve only changed my comparator to be a Microchip MCP6561R. It has a worst-case propagation delay of only 80ns which is 100 times faster than the one I used last time. And it’s still cheap: CHF 0.43 at Farnell if you buy 10.

Envelope Detector

I told you earlier that I had some trouble with my last envelope detector which utilized a VCVS active low-pass filter. If I turned up the gain too much I got wild output swings. I found a screen shot of that:

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Envelope going wild

Green is the amplifier output. We’re trying to get the envelope of that. But look what happens to the pink line when I turn up the gain. Nothing to do with an envelope. And I would like even more gain to make the envelope use (almost) all of the 0…5 volts range.

I haven’t really understood why that is. Suggestions anyone? The only thing I can think of is the rather narrow gain-bandwidth product of the op amp, 600kHz if I remember correctly.

So I’m using two op-amp buffers, each followed by a normal RC low-pass filter. So I can set any gain I want for the two buffers without affecting the signal shape. As an added benefit, I can now look at the signal after each buffer / filter. I’ve also changed the op-amps to be Microchip MCP601R. Less precise (we don’t need precision here) but fast (2.8MHz) and cheaper.

At the very input of the envelope detector I’m now using a second (not really matched but same type) diode (D2) to produce a bias voltage just a diode drop above ground to precisely compensate for the rectifying diode (D1) of the envelope detector.

The comparator at the output is now a MCP6561R as for the ZCD. Not that we need the speed here, just to use the same type.

Temperature measurement

Everything new here. LMT86 as a temperature sensor. Cheap, works from -50 to +150 degrees centigrade and is accurate to 0.4 degrees. Its output is between 1.5 and 2.5volts over the temperature of interest. It comes in a SC-70 package. That’s a bit small but still hand-solderable without problem.

There is no more op-amp to scale it up but I’ve added a rather precise 2.5V voltage reference, the ADR361. Quite an overkill maybe but I thought if you are measuring wind speed you are likely to also measure things like humidity, pressure, light intensity or something like that. So with the anemometer shield you get a precise and stable reference for all your measurements.

Summary

As you can see, I ended up changing quite a lot. When laying out the board I was surprised how easily everything fitted in. Not only did the fewer logic ICs save space themselves, it also greatly simplified signal routing. As you can see from the photos, I’ve already made a board. All the components have arrived as well so I’m ready to go ahead and build it up. I’m really looking forward to seeing how it will perform. I just hope everything works as planned.

All the board and schematic PDFs as well as the Eagle files can be found on the overview page as a .zip file: http://soldernerd.com/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer/

That’s it for now, click here for the finished shield: http://soldernerd.com/2014/11/28/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer-part-10-arduino-shield-ready/

Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer Part 8: More Software

In my last post I talked about how to get the Arduino to output bursts of 40kHz pulses. Today I’ll go through the rest of the software so by the end of this post we’ll have a very rudimentary but working sketch for our ultrasonic wind meter.

Click here for an overview over this series of posts on the Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer: http://soldernerd.com/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer/

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Overview over one round of measurements, i.e. each direction is measured once in turn.

If you’ve read part 7 of this series you will have noticed that all the key tasks are handled not in the main code but in interrupt service routines (ISRs). That’s fairly typical for an application like this one.

In this project, there are 2 ISRs:

  • TIMER1_COMPB Interrupt: It is triggered by Timer/Counter1. It sends 15 PWM pulses every 2ms and takes care of the Axis, Direction and Mute signals. Named TMR_INT on the screen shots in this post. This is what I’ve covered last time.
  • TIMER1_CAPT Interrupt: This is where all the measurement takes place. It is triggered by the envelope detector and zero-crossing detectcor. It reads the current value of Timer/Counter1. Named CAPT_INT on the screen shots in this post. This is what I’ve covered last time. This is mainly what I’ll be covering today.

The basic Idea of the software is as follows:

  1. Every measurement takes 2ms. It takes 375us (15 times 25us) to send the pulses plus 500us – 1500us for the pulses to arrive (assuming very extreme wind situations). So 2ms gives us plenty of time to finish our measurement.
  2. Shortly after sending the pulses we start listening and wait for the envelope detector to trigger TIMER1_CAPT interrupt. We save the current value of timer1, this is our coarse measurement of time-of-flight. We then set up interrupts to capture a rising edge of our zero-crossing detector (ZCD).
  3. A rising edge of our ZCD triggers TIMER_CAPT interrupt. We save the current value of timer1 and set up interrupts to capture a falling edge of the ZCD.
  4. A falling edge of our ZCD triggers TIMER_CAPT interrupt. We save the current value of timer1 and set up interrupts to capture a rising edge of the ZCD.
  5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until we’ve captured 8 rising and 8 falling edges. Averaging these will give us a very precise measurement of the phase shift.
  6. After every measurement we change the direction we measure:  N->S, E->W, S->N, W->E, …
  7. We measure each direction 32 times until we calculate the actual wind speed. So one full measurement will take 4 x 32 x 2ms = 256ms. So we take about 4 measurements per second.
overview2_172us
Overview over a single measuement

The screen shot above shows how a measuement proceeds: AXIS and DIRECTION are set depending on the direction to be measured. MUTE is driven high and 15 PWM pulses are sent. TMR_INT  triggers after every pulse in order to count them. After a short break, TMR_INT triggers again and turns MUTE off again. Eventually, the envelope detector (ENV_DETCT) triggers CAPT_INT. Shortly afterwards, CAPT_INT is triggered 16 more times by the zero-crossing detector (ZCD).

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Close-up of the actual measurement.

There are 2 sets of variables to save all the measurements from the envelope and zero-crossing detector: At any point in time, one is in use by the ongoing measurements, i.e. they’re being updated. The other set represents the last set of measurements and is static. This second set can be used by software in our main loop to calculate the wind speed and direction. As I’ve said, capturing one set of measurements takes 256ms. So we also have 256ms to do all the calculations, send data (via USB or whatever), write the new measurement to the display, do some data logging or whatever else we have in mind. There is likely to be some floating-point math, square roots and tigonometric functions going to be needed to arrive at the wind speed and direction but 256ms should be pretty comfortable even for that.

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A long series of measuements. Look at the cursors: It takes about 25ms to do our calculations.

This is what I’ve tried to show in the screenshot above: There is a signal named CALC which is driven high when a new set of measuements becomes available and driven low when the calculations are finished. So this signal shows you how much time the Arduino’s Atmega328 spends processing the data and writing to the display. As you can see, it’s less than 25ms so there is ample of room for more complex calculations or other tasks. We’ll definitely need some of that head room since the calculations performed so far are really just the bare minimum.

There definitely is still a lot to be improved, mainly how the raw measurements are evaluated to get the actual wind speed. But what’s more important to me at this time is that the basic idea/setup works. With no wind, my measuements fluctuate somewhere between plus/minus 0.3 meters per second without having done any calibration. It also reacts nicely when I blow a bit of air towards it.

I’ve changed the pinout many times while developing this software but I’m confident that I won’t have to change the pinout any more. So my plan is to now build version 2 of the hardware first. The entire setup will be much less complex (and prone to errors) without all the lose wires going back and forth between the different boards. Then, with the updated and hopefully final (or nearly final) hardware I’ll go ahead and finish the software.

Speaking of software: You can download the Arduino sketch from the overview page where you also find the Eagle files for both boards: http://soldernerd.com/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer/. I’ll make it a habit to post all the download material for this project on the overview page so people don’t need to go through all the posts trying to find a certain file.

That’s it for today, continue here to my next post of this series: http://soldernerd.com/2014/11/25/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer-part-9-a-new-hardware/

Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer Part 7: Basic software

Today I’ll tell you how I got started with my software. If you’re new to my blog you might want to click here for an overview over my arduino-based wind meter project: http://soldernerd.com/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer/

The first thing we’ll need to archive is to send a series of pulses at 40kHz which is the frequency the ultrasonic transducers work. They must be as precise and repeatable as possible since all our measurements depend on them. Any jitter and the like will affect our measurements. And the duty cycle should be 50%. So you really want to do them in hardware. The Atmega328 comes with a single 16-bit counter/timer (Timer/Counter1) as well as two 8-bit counters (Timer/Counter 0 and 2). We’ll need the 16-bit resolution so the choice is clear: Timer1.

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Sending pulses using timer/counter1

Well yes, you could easily use one of the 8-bit counters to generate your pulses but you’ll still need timer1 for measurement. I’ve decided to do everything with just one timer so it’s going to be timer1.

How many pulses we should send is not so clear. I’m working with 15 pulses which works quite well but I’m not claiming it’s an optimal choice. But it is short enough to make sure we’ve stopped transmitting before the first sound waves reach the opposite transducer, even with heavy tail wind.

Since we have such strict requirements for our pulses, we can’t rely on any of those convenient high-level functions to set up our timer but have to study the Atmega328 datasheet and do it ourselfs.

This is what I have done:

pinMode(10, OUTPUT);
TCCR1A = 0b00100011;
TCCR1B = 0b11011001;
OCR1AH = 0x01;
OCR1AL = 0x8F;
OCR1BH = 0x00;
OCR1BL = 0xC7;

This is a short explanation of what it does: Set pin 10 as an output. Arduino pin10 is pin16 of the Atmega328. And that’s the pin connected to the output B of timer1. That’s line 1.

I then set up counter1 in FastPWM mode running at the full system clock frequency of 16MHz. Output B (that’s our pin 10 on the arduino) is set high when the counter starts at zero. It will be cleared (i.e. set low) when the timer reaches the value in output compare register B (OCR1B). The counter will be reset when (i.e.it will start at zero again) when it reaches the value in couput compare register A (OCR1A). I also enable an interrupt for when the timer overflows. More on that later. That’s lines 2 and 3.

Then comes the part where I actually set duty cycle and pulse with. I do that by setting the output compare registers. OCR1AH and OCR1AB are the high and low bytes of register OCR1A. So the final value in that register is 0x018F which equals to 399. That means counter 1 will count from 0 up to 399 before it starts again. That’s 400 steps. And here’s the math: The timer runs at 16MHz, our counter will overflow every 400 cycles. 16000000 / 400 = 40000. That’s exactly the 40kHz we’re looking for. The duty cycle is set to half that time by setting OCR1B to 199 or 0x00C7.

That’s it. We have a perfect PWM signal at exactly 40kHz and 50% duty cycle. Look at the screenshot above to convince you that this is exactly what we are getting.

But so far, the pulses go on forever. What we need is a way to turn the output signal off after 15 (say) pulses. One way of doing that is to count the pulses and turn the output off once the 15 pulses have been sent. That’s what the interrupt at overflow is used for.

In that ISR (interrupt service routine) I increment the variable pulse_count. Once pulse_count reaches 15 I know that all the pulses have been sent and turn the output off: TCCR1A = 0b00000011; The timer/counter will continue to run but the PWM output has been turned off.

For debugging/monitoring purposes, I set pin A5 high at the beginning of the ISR and low at the end. So I can tell when (and how long) the ISR is running by monitoring pin A5. Here’s what I get:

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Pulses sent (yellow) and time spent in timer interrupts (blue)

The yellow signal is the PWM output (pin10) as before. The blue line shows the time spent handling the interrupt. I could then continue counting without sending any pulses and turn the output back on when I reach 80 for example. And at the very beginning that’s exactly what I did. But then the microcontroller has to handle an interrupt every 25us (microseconds) even when not sending pulses. That’s quite wasteful so I set a longer time period by increasing the OCR1A and OCR1B registers seen above.

Actually, I’m using this interrupt to do some other things as well such as setting Axis and Direction as well as the Mute signal and some other housekeeping. That wide blue pulse you see at the left side of the screenshot above does most of that, that’s why it is so wide.

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Time consumed handling a regular timer overflow interrupt

Speaking of time consumed handling interrupts. It’s quite significant as you can see here: About 5 microseconds for a normal (just counting) interrupt. That’s 20% of CPU time while sending pulses (5us every 25us). That’s muuuch more than I ever imagined it to be. That’s about 80 instructions. I’m writing in C so I’ll have to check the assember code produced by the compiler to see what’s going on.

Click here for the next post of this series: http://soldernerd.com/2014/11/23/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer-part-8-more-software/

Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer Part 6: Mechanical design

If you’ve read through my previous posts of this series you know that here is an Arduino and two home-made PCBs together with 4 transducers waiting to work together as an ultrasonic wind meter. If you haven’t you may click here for an overview of posts on my anemometer project: https://soldernerd.wordpress.com/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer/

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Milling the base plate.

For this wind meter to work, the four transducers need to be held in place somehow. Even during testing and development I wanted some reliable mechanical setup so that I don’t need to worry about it all the time. For this prototype I don’t need anything waterproof that I can put outside for a prolonged period of time. Anyway it will be sitting on my bench most of the time so wood works just fine for me.

Here two videos of the CNC milling machine at work:

The transducers are 16mm in diameter. 16mm plastic pipes are readily available from hardware stores. They are intended for electrical wiring so you also get matching angles and the like. So I got myself 8 90-degree angles and a 2m pipe from a local hardware store. I think I’ve mentioned before that I want the transducers to sit in a 20cm distance so make the wind meter rather compact.

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More CNC milling.

I’ve just recently attended a CNC machining course at the Zurich Fab Lab (http://zurich.fablab.ch/) so I decided to do my first CNC milling project and use my newly aquired knowledge to make a wooden base to hold the plastic tubes (and PCBs) in place.

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Mounting the PCBs. Still using my Arduino Mega here.

I’ve used some left over 18mm melamine-coated multiplex. It’s extremely sturdy and has a nice smooth surface. I ran my first tests with a Arduino Mega so that’s what you see above but I’ve replaced that with a Uno by now. So all the software development will take place on an Arduino Uno and its Atmega328.

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My prototype sitting on the bench

Besides the two boards you already know, there is a 2×16 characters LCD. I thought it would be nice to have a display connected to the Arduino when writing the software. Just to see what you’re doing. An easy way to drop some debugging output and of course display the measurements once we are ready to actually run this thing.

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View from above

There is a little PCB attached to the LCD display. It mainly holds a trimmer to adjust the contrast as well as a resistor for the backlight LED. Since I had to make a board anyway I also included a 10uF plus 100nF ceramic capacitor as well as a protection diode.

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Lots of wires to connect everything

As you can see from the photos above, there are definitely more and longer wires than necessary. But for a prototype I’m always reluctant to soldering things and cutting wires to their minimal or optimal length. I like to be able to just unplug a board and do some changes to it.

When I started writing my software I didn’t have a clue which signal will be on which pin. I just plugged them in as I went along. And I changed it several times until I was finally happy with it. So I do need some flexibility. But it also makes the setup a bit of a mess I must admit.

Ok, the hardware is working now. Time to write some software and see if we get it all up and running. See you next time.

Click here: http://soldernerd.com/2014/11/21/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer-part-7-basic-software/

Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer Part 5: Testing the digital board

In the last post I went through the analog board and showed what I had to do to get it working properly. Today I’ll do the same whith the digital board.  Click here for an overview over this series of posts on the anemometer project: https://soldernerd.wordpress.com/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer/

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The corrected digital board

So I plugged in the board for the first time and everything looked fine. The power LED came on, both the +5V and -5V rails worked as expected. But not everything worked that well.

I’ve explained in a previous post how the Arduino can control the direction by means of two lines: Axis and Direction. Here’s the meaning of these signals (L=low, H=high):

Axis=L, Direction=L -> North to South

Axis=L, Direction=H -> South to North

Axis=H, Direction=L -> East to West

Axis=H, Direction=H -> West to East

The first thing these two signals do is to control 74HC139 address decoder. The 139’s enable signal is grounded so its outputs are always on. Depending on Axis and Direction the 139 turns exactly one of the signals North_EN, South_EN, East_EN and West_EN on. EN stands for enable. As the bar over the signal name indicates, these are active-low signals. So zero volts means on and 5V means off. Each of these enable signals is connected to an LED. The other side of the LEDs is connected (via a resistor of course) to +5V so the LED is on when the signal is on despite the fact that it is active low. This part also worked.

Then we have two 74HC368 hex inverters. If you look at the 368s data sheet you’ll notice that it consists of 6 inverting buffers. But there are only two enable signals. As with most enable signals, these too are active-low. One enable signal controls 4 of the inverting buffers while the other one controls only 2. For us, this doesn’t matter since we need a total of 4 groups (one for each transducer) of 2 buffers each (one for each transducer pin). So we’ll only use two buffers of each group no matter if there are four.

Each group is controlled by one of the enable signals coming from the 139. The North_EN signal enables the buffers of the group connected to the North transducers and so forth. So exactly one group of buffers is on at any given time. That’s the transducer that is transmitting. All 4 buffer groups are connected to the same PWM signal (named Signal on the schematic) coming from the Arduino. But since only one buffer group is on, only that transducer is actually sending. The other buffer outputs are off and their transducer pins can float freely. Notice how the PWM signal is connected to the input of only one of the buffers in each group. The output of that buffer ist then connected a transducer pin as well as to the input of a second buffer. So one pins of the transmitting transducer are always in opposite states. When the first one is high, the second one is low and vice versa. There were no surprises here, everything worked as expected.

AxisDirection
How Axis and Direction control the 74HC139

Here’s a little visualization of the 74HC139 in action. Note the glitches in the West_EN and East_EN signals. The Arduino can’t change both Axis and Direction perfectly simultaneously, there will always be at least one clock cycle in between the two commands. That’s why those glitches happen. But Axis and Direction are changed between measurements so nothing interesting is going on anyway. No need to worry about this here.

But then there is the task of selecting the right signal to listen to. And that’s where I’ve messed up just about everything. I guess I just wanted to build my first prototype as soon as possible and didn’t double-check everything as I should have. I probably also tried to be clever and use as few signals as possible and chose my inputs so that it simplifies the physical routing on the PCB. Anyway, I ended up with a design that doesn’t work. So if you want to build this circuit, look at the RevB board and schematics where I’ve corrected the mistakes.

As explained before, there are three 74HC4052 multiplexers to eliminate crosstalk. Like the 139, the 4052s are controlled by Axis and direction. But watch out: You need to select the transducer opposite from the one that is transmitting. So for example Axis=L and Direction=L means North to South. North_EN is low so the North buffer group is on and so North is transmitting. That means we have to chose the South transducer for receiving. Nothing complicated, really. But you have to concentrate and think carefully about which transducer has to connected to which of inputs. There are multiple solutions that work but many more that don’t.

My working solution is as follows: IC5 selects between North and East. So North is connected to input 1 while East is connected to input 3. When we want to listen to North, East is idle and vice versa. That’s why we get rid of crosstalk. The negative output of IC5 is grounded, the positive one is named NorthEast and routed to IC6. The second multiplexer, IC7 selects between South on input 0 and West on input 2. Again, the negative output is grounded and the positive output named SouthWest is connected to IC6. IC6 then only has the simple task of choosing between SouthWest and NorthEast. That’s why I only needed my Direction signal to control this multiplexer. The other address input can be left grounded.

I didn’t bother building another board so I’ve just used some pieces of wire to correct my mistakes. The corrected circuit is equivalent to what you see on the RevB schematic and works flawlessly.

This was definitely not my most interesting post so far. Lots of text and much in the way of photos or screenshots. Analog circuits are usually more fun to work with I find. Next time I’ll connect the Arduino to my two boards and show you how they perform. There will be some photos and screen shots again, promise.

Click here for the next post: https://soldernerd.wordpress.com/2014/11/19/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer-part-6-mechanical-design/

Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer Part 4: Testing the analog board

In this post I will go through the testing of the analog circuit and what I had to do to make it work properly. Click here for an overview over this series of posts on the anemometer project: https://soldernerd.wordpress.com/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer/

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A first, basic test setup.

Ok, so the the analog board is finally ready and all the components have been soldered into place. Time to see if it works as expected. My test setup looked as follows: I’ve programmed an Arduino (a Mega as you can see in the background, I didn’t have a Uno at that time but it doesn’t matter for what I’m doing here) to output 15 pulses at 40kHz from one of its pins (followed by a break of a few milliseconds). That pin was connected to one of the pins of a transducer while the other transducer pin was grounded. A second transducer was placed accross from the first one in a 20cm distance. That’s the distance/size I’m planning to use in the final design as it keeps the wind meter nice and compact. One pin of that second transducer was grounded while the other one was connected to the amplifier input of the analog board. So there are only 2 transducers at this time. One constantly transmitting, the other constantly receiving. Software is also minimal. Keep it simple for now, we’re just trying out the analog circuit.

Amplifier

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Transmitted signal and amplifier in- and output.

Here we have the transmitted signal in red at the bottom left, together with the amplifier input (yellow), output of the first stage (green) and output of the second stage (purple). On the positive side, the received signal (amplifier input) is quite strong, around 350mV peak-to-peak. But the amplifier is barely working. At the output of the second stage we want a signal in the range of 5V pp but we get just a bit more than 700mV. We’re using a two-stage tuned amplifier and only double the signal amplitude. That’s hopeless.

As I’ve said in part 3, the root cause for this is my poor choice for the inductor/capacitor combination. 47uH or 330nF at 40kHz only give an impedance of 12 Ohms. Even with a decent Q-factor the impedance across the LC tank will never be high enough. I’d rather use something like 1mH / 15nF or 470uH / 33nF as as Carl did. But I didn’t have a inductor like that at hand so I had to change some other components to fix it.

First I changed the bypass capacitors (C5 and C10) from 100nF to 1uF. That makes the emitter ‘more grounded’ at signal frequencies (4 ohms instead of 40 ohms if you do the math). That did help but was not enough to save the show.

I then changed the emitter resistors (R8 and R13) from 330 ohms to only 47 ohms. The logic behind this is simple: The voltage across the LC tank is too small because the impedance is too low. Voltage is current times resistance (or impedance). I can’t change the impedance because I don’t have a suitable inductor so I have to increase the current. Changing the base resistors does just that.

Now I have plenty of gain at the price of a much-higher-than-planned quiescent current. Actually, gain was even a bit too high so I put in 15 ohms for R7 and R12 to slightly reducing the gain. Power consumption is not really a concern in this prototype so we’re fine for now. But if you’re going to build your own, use a big enough inductor in the first place and you won’t have to jerk up the current just to squeeze out enough gain.

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Amplifier after fixing the gain

Amplifier input (yellow), output of the second stage(green) and output of the second stage (purple). Note the different scales of 200mV, 1V and 2V per division. As you can see, the gain’s fine now. We’re getting a bit more than 4 Volts of amplitude peak-to-peak which is just what we need.

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Close-up of the amplifier signals

You can also see how much cleaner the output is compared to the input. The yellow signal has picked up quite a bit of noise gut the purple signal looks perfectly clean. That’s the benefit we get from the narrow bandwidth of the tuned amplifier. And that’s why you don’t want to just use an op-amp.

Envelope detector

Let’s turn to the envelope detector now. Fortunately this part worked right from the start but that doesn’t mean it can’t be improved. I’ve used a voltage divider of 1M and 47k (R14 and R15) to get a voltage of 2.2 Volts which just about compensates for the drop over the schottky diode D1. Maybe I’ll use an identical diode in my next design to get a voltage exactly one diode drop above ground.

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Envelope before and after smoothing

Here we see the transmitted signal (red) together with the amplifier output (purple), the output of the diode / input of the low-pass filter (green) and the filter output (yellow). Note how the filter makes the stairs in the green signal disapear. That’s exactly its purpose.

I found the envelope to be a bit slow so I’ve changed the resistors R16 and R17 from 47k to 22k. Together with the 1nF caps (C15 and C16) that gives a -3db point of 7.2kHz. That makes the envelope quite a bit faster which means the rising edge will also be steeper. That makes it easier to precisely trigger on it, provided it is still smooth. Obviously you have to strike some balance here. Not sure if my values now are perfect but they definitely do work ok.

One problem I’ve encountered is that I get some nasty oscillations in the envelope if I turn up the gain too high (via the pot R1). Making the envelope faster has made it even worse. I’m not quite sure why that is. It’s my first time to work with a VCVS (voltage controlled voltage source) circuit such as this active filter. I might use two stages of simple op-amp buffers and RC filters in my next design. That means I’ll need an extra op amp but anyway. For now, I just have to be modest with the gain setting and everything is fine.

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Envelope detector in action

This screenshot shows the envelope detector in action: Transmitted signal (red), amplifier output (purple), envelope (yellow) and output of the envelope detector (green). Note that this screenshot was taken before the changed cutoff frequency of the filter. The yellow curve is very smooth but doesn’t track the purple amplifier output very well. That’s why I thought it was a bit slow.

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Close-up of the envelope detector triggering on the rising edge of the envelope

The green signal is the output of the comparator which is also the output of our envelope detector. It will be connected to the Arduino where it will trigger an interrupt and serve as a coarse measurement of the time-of-flight.

Zero-crossing detector

My zero-crossing detector is extremely simple. I set the inverting input of the comparator to half the supply rail by means of R23 and R24. The 100nF cap across R24 (C21) makes sure it stays there and doesn’t swing around itself. I bias the amplifier output to the very same 2.5 volts so I really trigger exactly when the sine wave crosses zero. R22 makes sure the non-inverting input to the comparator can swing freely and the input impedance is reasonably high.

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Zero-crossing detector

Here we see the output of the amplifier / input to the zero-crossing detector (purple) together with the zero-crossing detector output. Everything seems to work fine. As expected, the detector also triggers on very small signals and potentially noise but that should not pose a problem.

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Close-up of the zero-crossing detector input and output

These are the same two signals watched a bit more closely. You might notice that there is quite a bit of time delay from the actual zero-crossing to where the green signal changes. This won’t be a problem as long as the delay is constant but I’m planning to use a faster comparator in my next design. This one has a propagation delay of 8us according to its data sheet. You can get others that are two orders of magnitude faster for nearly the same price such as the MCP6561R with a propagation delay of only 80ns.

Temperature measurement

No surprises here. The output of the LM35 is 10mV per degree centigrade as expected and is amplified by a factor of 4.3 by the op amp. Can’t quite remember why I chose only 4.3, I might change that to 11 by changing  R25 to 10k.

Next time I’ll go through the same kind of stuff for the digital circuit. Click here: https://soldernerd.wordpress.com/2014/11/18/arduino-ultrasonic-anemometer-part-5-testing-the-digital-board/