Tag Archives: lab power supply

Arduino MPPT Solar Charger Shield – Software

There have been two previous posts on this project: one on the concept and the hardware and one on hardware testing. You probably want to check them out first if you’re not yet familiar with this project. Or even better: Click here for an overview over this project.

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Maintaining an input voltage of 17 volts even if that means a lower-than-desirable voltage at the output

Now that we know that we have a functioning MPPT solar charger we are ready to talk about the software (or the sketch as the Arduino folks call it). It’s quite simple, really. So this will be a short post. And yes, you can download the sketch. There is a link at the end of this post. As always, I appreciate any feedback, comments and the like.

There is a number of basic tasks the arduino needs to perform in order for this shield to be useful. I’ll go through them one by one.

Controlling the DC-DC converter

At the heart of this project there is a synchronous step-down (or buck) DC-DC converter that is controlled by a PWM signal from the arduino. So one of the tasks is to set the frequency and duty cycle of that PWM signal.

We let the PWM signal run at the maximum frequency the arduino allows with an 8 bit resulution. Thats simply 16MHz (the Arduino’s frequency) divided by 256 (the 8 bit resolution), or 62.5 kHz. So the prescaler will be 1.

As you can see from the shields’s schematic, we need to output the PWM signal from Pin 6 (by the Arduino’s pin numbering, not Atmel’s). In order to do this kind of low-level stuff you’ll have to read the Atmega328’s data sheet. There is usually no Arduino-ish shortcut if you really need to controll what’s going on.

Luckily it’s just a few lines of code to set things up. All in the function buck_setup(). There are three more little functions to control the DC-DC controller once it’s set up:

buck_enable() and buck_disable() are very simple and just turn it on  and off, respectively. buck_duty(uint8_t duty) is only slightly more involved. It changes the duty cycle to the value you pass to it. Besides that it ensures that the duty cycle stays within certain limits.

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Test setup with resistor-based dummy load

You don’t want it to go to 100% since in order to keep the bootstrap capacitor C6 charged you need a little bit of off-time. In order to drive the upper FET you need a voltage higher than the panel’s voltage and that’s exactly what C6 is for. So we enforce an upper limit on the duty cycle.

Likewise, you don’t want your duty cycle to go below 50% because in that case you would be pumping energy from the battery to the pannel. A synchronous step-down converter is basically the same thing as a synchronous step-up (aka boost) converter with input and output confused. So we also want to enforce a lower limit on the duty cycle.

The upper and lower limits are set through the #defines DUTY_CYCLE_MINIMUM and DUTY_CYCLE_MAXIMUM.

Measuring voltage and current

The shield has all the hardware necessary to measure both voltage and current both at the input as well as on the output. We’ll just need to write some simple software to make good use of that hardware.

Unlike with the PWM singal where we had to do some low-level bit fiddling ourselfs we can just rely on convenient Arduino library functions to do the job. Basically, analogRead() is all we need here.

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Nicely regulating so that the input stays at 17 volts

I’ve written a function called read_values() that uses analogRead() to read all 4 values (input voltage, output voltage, input current and output current) 16 times each, averages the results and converts the ADC reading to proper voltages and currents.

The necessary multipliers are defined as floats in VIN_MULTIPLIER, VOUT_MULTIPLIER, IIN_MULTIPLIER and IOUT_MULTIPLIER. I’m doing all the voltage and current measurements in floating math. Yes, this is not at all efficient but we don’t need the Arduino’s computational power for anything else most of the time so this is fine here. Just keep in mind that you can save a lot of resources here if you ever need to do so.

Displaying voltage and current on the LCD

Our hardware also involves a 2 lines x 16 characters LCD so we can show the world what we are measuring. Again, we can rely on standard Arduino functionality to do the job. There is an LCD library that does everything we need.

So my function write_display() can focus entirely on formatting. The upper line shows the voltages in Volts, the lower line shows the currents in Milliamps. The input is on the left hand side of the display, the output on the right.

Deciding what to do

In the first section we’ve discussed the functions necessary to controll the DC-DC converter. But in order to use those functions, the Arduino needs to first decide what to do.

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66% duty cycle at 21V input voltage gives the desired 13.8V at the output

This is where the function buck_update() comes into play. You could consider this the heart of this sketch. This is where all the relevant decisions are made. When to turn the converter on, when to turn it off, when to increase the duty cycle, when to decrease it… You get the idea.

The behaviour of buck_update() is controlled by 8 #defines. I list them here together with the values I have used:

#define ENABLE_VOLTAGE 18.0
#define DISABLE_VOLTAGE 15.0
#define INPUT_TARGET_VOLTAGE 17.0
#define OUTPUT_TARGET_VOLTAGE_LOW 13.8
#define OUTPUT_TARGET_VOLTAGE_HIGH 13.9
#define INPUT_CURRENT_LIMIT 2000.0
#define OUTPUT_CURRENT_LIMIT 3000.0
#define INPUT_CURRENT_MINIMUM 0.0

I think they are quite self-explanatory, especially if you look at how they are used inside buck_update. It’s quite simple: If the panel’s voltage rises above 18V, turn the converter on. Once the converter is on, try to archieve a panel voltage of 17V without exceeding 13.9V at the output. If the panel’s voltage drops below 15V turn the converter off again.

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At 55% duty cycle with a 16.9V input voltage we’re getting only around 9.2V at the output

Besides that the function is also looking at the input and output current and makes sure certain limits are not exceeded. But with a 30W panel it should never be possible to reach those limits anyway.

Putting it all together

Now all we need to do in the loop() function is calling read_values(), buck_update() and write_display(). Since writing to the LCD is quite slow we are only doing it every 32nd time we read the values and update the PWM signal.

With this sketch I’ve hooked the MPPT Solar Charger up to my lab power supply. (a Keysight E3645A, my newest toy *g*) and my extremely simple but occasionally useful resistor-based dummy load.

The enable and disable voltages are simple and work as expected. Maximum output volage is also not tricky. If the voltage at the output goes too high, the duty cycle is decreased and everything is fine again.

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There’s not much to photograph when you’re writing and testing software

More interesting was to see how the shield would regulate when faced with a limited current budget at the input. For that the supply was set to a voltage of 21V (about a 12V solar panel’s open-circuit voltage) with a current limit of 100mA to 500mA. That’s quite a nasty supply, quite a bit trickier to handle than a real solar panel. Try to pull just a bit too much current and the voltage will drop to zero…

Also, the resistors at the output are not a realistic load for the converter. A car battery will pull no current at 12 volts or so (unless overly discharged) but will quickly start to sink large currents when the voltage goes just a bit higher and the battery is charging.

But I think the setup is good enough to test the sketch. And it handles the challenge quite well. With all resistors on (i.e a 100/6 ohms load) and a 300mA current limit, the input voltage sits at 17V (our target input voltage) while 9.25V appear at the output. At 400mA, the output voltage rises to 10.7V with the input still at 17V. At 600mA the input is still at 17V but with the output now at 13.15V. If I take the current limit even higher, the output voltage rises to 13.82V but not any higher, just as we want. The input voltage rises to 21V (since this is a lab supply and not a panel) with a corresponding drop in current to 530mA.

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Quite realistic: The charger is pulling as much current as it can with the current limit at 530mA and reaches an output voltage just above 12 volts

I’m honestly quite happy with the project as it is now. The idea definitely works and I’m motivated to design a new, deployable version with some fancy features that will use much less power at the same time. I’ve already done quite some work on that new version but it will take another few weeks until I get to describe that project here.

Until then I will show you some other, smaller projects that I’ve already finished but didn’t have time to document yet. So you will first see a number of smaller, simpler projects over the next few weeks.

Before I forget: There’s the Arduino sketch for download. And click here for an overview over this project.

USB Boost Converter

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Finished 5V to 12V USB boost converter

I frequently need a low-power supply to run a microcontroller system. Typically, one uses a lab power for such purposes. But at least on the desk where I do the programming I don’t have one. Since these systems typically consume little current it would be handy to be able to power them from USB. Most of my devices have on-board regulators so the voltage is rather uncritical. For 3.3 volt devices, the 5V from USB is just right. But others have a 5V regulator so they need a higher supply voltage. And even others might even need 12 volts.

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Fully assembled PCB

So I decided to build a small low-power boost converter with a USB plug on its input. The output voltage is set by a pair of resistors. So once built the output voltage is fix but my idea is to build several of them anyway. So some will produce 12V while others will produce 7.5V. The latter is intended to power all those systems with on-board 5V regulators. Of course, you could use a trimmer or pot if you wanted a variable voltage version. However, the feedback loop requires a capacitor for stability and its value also depends on output voltage. You might well find a value that results in stable operation over a say 6 – 12V range, but I haven’t tried that.

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Bottom side

I had a look for a suitable integrated switcher IC and found the Texas Instruments LMR62014. It comes in a small SOT23-5 package. It switches at a high frequency of 1.6MHz which will keep the other components small, too. It switches up to 1.4 amps. It’s easy to use. And even afordable, around 1.50 a piece. The datasheet is very helpful when it comes to PCB layout. It includes a two-layer sample layout that works even with hobbyist-sized components (0805, 1206 for the input and output capacitors).

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Not a bad heat sink

Generally, layout is important with switch-mode DC-DC converters. Their operation requires switching square-wave power signals (as opposed to just logical-level signals where little current flows). And that requires careful layout in order to minimize stray inductance, mainly. Things are more forgiving when you work with relatively slow (say 100kHz) switchers but get much more demanding when switching at higher frequencies. There has been a steady trend to ever-higher frequencies and 1.6MHz is fairly high even by 2015 standards. So I was very happy to have a nice layout example to start with.

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Top side

As you can see from the photo above, the thing is small, only 26 x 14mm. Also note how the layout makes the components magically fit together without any long traces and few vias.

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Home brew constant current dummy load in action

So far, I’ve built two units, one running at 12V, the other at 7.5V. Theoretically, one should be able to pull 580mA and 930mA from them, respectively. Of course, these are theoretical figures assuming no losses. Also, the 1.4A rating on the IC is likely the current limit at the top of the switching cycle (the datasheet will tell you or course but I don’t have the PDF open right now), not an average. And thermal considerations might also put limits on continuous currents. More on that later. And don’t expect to be able to pull 1.4A from a random USB port (which would violate the USB specifications anyway). But given my use-case for these things I’m entirely happy if I can pull a 100mA or so. And that should work comfortably.

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Switcher IC: 70 degrees @ 200mA
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Diode: 58 degrees @ 200mA
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Coil: 50 degrees @ 200mA

I’ve pushed both versions to their respective limits on the bench, using a stiff 5V supply and my home-brew constant current dummy load (link). With case temperatures approaching 100 degrees centigrade I was able to pull around 250mA of continuous current from the 12V version. The ICs include thermal limiting so you don’t need to worry too much about damaging them when performing this kind of tests. As you can see on the photos, I did these tests with the naked PCBs sitting in a vise which probabely made a not-so-bad heatsink for the board as a whole.

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Output voltage folds back when the switcher gets too hot

I’ve encountered slight stability problems with the 12V version (but not with the 7.5V one). There is some oscillation at currents above 200mA or so. Changing the value of the compensation capacitor changed the frequency and amplitude but I haven’t managed to get rid of it entirely. But anyway, I won’t run them at 200mA so I haven’t put much more effort into this.

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Close up of the final product

The finished units have a USB wire on the input and a arduino-compatible plug on the output. To protect against short-circuits I’ve put them in a piece of shrinking hose which is a bit of a themal nightmare of course. There is also a voltage drop over the USB cable which means the input voltage seen by the converter is below 5V even with a perfectly stiff USB port. Which in turn means more work for our converter, making things worse.

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Shrinking hose doesn’t help in keeping it cool

I have frequently used the 7.5V version to power my Ultrasonic Anemometer which pulls around 60mA. That’s the kind of application that I had in mind for this little device and it works well for that. It hardly gets warm at all and provides reliable power on my desk without the need for a lab power supply.

Attached the Eagle files as well as a PDF of the schematic and layout: USB_BoostConverter